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Constipation Treatment - What Is Polyethylene Glycol 3350 Used For?

This page contains links to eMedTV Constipation Articles containing information on subjects from Constipation Treatment to What Is Polyethylene Glycol 3350 Used For?. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Constipation Treatment
    Dietary changes, lifestyle changes, and laxatives can all be used to treat constipation. As this article from the eMedTV library explains, the treatment your doctor recommends will depend on the severity of the constipation.
  • Constpation
    Constipation is one of the most common gastrointestinal complaints in the United States. This eMedTV resource explains how common constipation is and explores the causes of this condition. Constpation is a common misspelling of constipation.
  • Cronic Constipation
    People with chronic constipation may have painful bowel movements of dry, hard stool. This eMedTV Web page discusses constipation and offers tips for relieving it. Cronic constipation is a common misspelling and variation of constipation.
  • Diagnosing Constipation
    When diagnosing constipation, your doctor looks at your medical history and results of your physical exam. This eMedTV page explains how extensive testing, including x-rays, may be required for diagnosing constipation in people with severe symptoms.
  • Drug Interactions With Polyethylene Glycol 3350
    Currently, no drug interactions are known to occur with polyethylene glycol 3350. As this article on the eMedTV Web site explains, however, there may be interactions that are not known at this time but that may be discovered at a later date.
  • Foods That Cause Constipation
    Foods that cause constipation are usually low-fiber, processed foods. As this eMedTV resource explains, foods that cause constipation can include frozen dinners, instant mashed potatoes, snack foods (such as chips and pizza), and many others.
  • Generic GlycoLax
    As this eMedTV page explains, GlycoLax is a generic form of MiraLAX. Although GlycoLax is no longer made, several different generic forms are still available. This Web article lists these generics and explains whether they are equivalent to GlycoLax.
  • Glycalax
    Although GlycoLax is no longer made, several generic forms are available. This eMedTV Web page further discusses this laxative, including possible side effects and details on how the drug works. Glycalax is a common misspelling of GlycoLax.
  • GlycoLax
    GlycoLax is a nonprescription laxative used to treat constipation. This eMedTV article further explains that although this laxative is no longer made, other generic versions are available. Possible side effects and safety issues are also provided.
  • GlycoLax and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if GlycoLax passes through breast milk. This page from the eMedTV Web archives explains why no research has been done on the possible risks of breastfeeding and using GlycoLax, and why it's unlikely that it would cause problems.
  • GlycoLax and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to use GlycoLax when pregnant. This selection from the eMedTV Web site further explains why the FDA has classified this laxative as a pregnancy Category C medication and discusses when a doctor may recommend using GlycoLax.
  • GlycoLax Dosage
    The usual GlycoLax dosage for treating constipation is 17 grams of powder dissolved in liquid once daily. This eMedTV page further describes specific dosing guidelines for using this laxative, with important tips on when and how to take GlycoLax.
  • GlycoLax Drug Interactions
    Currently, there are no known GlycoLax drug interactions. As this eMedTV segment explains, however, it is possible that not all interactions are known at this time, so tell your doctor about all medications you are taking before using this laxative.
  • GlycoLax Manufacturer
    Perrigo Company and American Health Packaging are some of the manufacturers of GlycoLax generics. As this eMedTV article explains, GlycoLax is no longer made, but there are several different generic versions still available.
  • GlycoLax Medication Information
    As a laxative, GlycoLax can help relieve constipation. This selection from the eMedTV Web site offers more information on this medication, including how to use it, possible side effects, and who may not be able to safely take this laxative.
  • GlycoLax Overdose
    If you take too much GlycoLax, you may have diarrhea and possibly dehydration. This eMedTV Web resource describes what to expect with an overdose, including information on how a healthcare provider may treat any problems that occur.
  • GlycoLax Powder
    As a type of laxative, GlycoLax is used to treat constipation. This eMedTV segment provides a brief description of GlycoLax, including how to mix this powder, when to take it, and possible side effects. A link to more information is also included.
  • GlycoLax Side Effects
    Nausea, gas, and diarrhea are some of the potential side effects of GlycoLax. This eMedTV resource lists other common side effects of the product and also explains which problems are potentially serious and require immediate medical attention.
  • GlycoLax Uses
    GlycoLax is a nonprescription laxative approved to help relieve constipation. This eMedTV page further describes uses for GlycoLax, including possible "off-label" (unapproved) reasons to use this medicine and whether it is safe for use in children.
  • GlycoLax Warnings and Precautions
    If you have a history of a bowel obstruction, you may not be able to safely use GlycoLax. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at other important precautions and warnings for GlycoLax, including information on who should not use this laxative.
  • How GlycoLax Works
    This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of how GlycoLax works to treat constipation. This article also explains how long it takes for this laxative to begin working and discusses other dosing recommendations. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Laxative GlycoLax
    This eMedTV page talks about how the laxative GlycoLax works to treat constipation. This article also takes a look at possible side effects and explains how long it takes for this medication to start working. A link to more information is also included.
  • PEG-3350
    As a laxative, polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG-3350) works by drawing water into the colon. This eMedTV segment further describes what PEG-3350 is and how it works, as well as details on how this laxative is taken and potential side effects.
  • Polyehtylene Glycol
    Polyethylene is an over-the-counter laxative used to treat constipation. This eMedTV page explains how this laxative works, lists possible side effects, and covers some dosing tips. Polyehtylene glycol is a common misspelling of polyethylene glycol.
  • Polyethylene Glycol 3350
    People who have occasional constipation may find relief with polyethylene glycol 3350. This eMedTV page further describes this medication, with information on how it works to soften the stool, when and how to take it, safety precautions, and more.
  • Polyethylene Glycol 3350 Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the recommended polyethylene glycol 3350 dosage for adults with occasional constipation is 17 grams of powder dissolved in a beverage and swallowed once a day. This page also offers some helpful tips on taking this laxative.
  • Polyethylene Glycol 3350 Drug Information
    Available without a prescription, polyethylene glycol 3350 is used to treat occasional constipation. This eMedTV page offers more information on this drug, including how polyethylene glycol 3350 works, possible side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Polyethylene Glycol 3350 Manufacturer
    Schering-Plough HealthCare Products is the manufacturer of polyethylene glycol 3350 (MiraLAX). This eMedTV segment also lists some of the manufacturers of the generic versions of this laxative. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Polyethylene Glycol 3350
    Using polyethylene glycol 3350 may cause allergic reactions or an electrolyte imbalance. This eMedTV article describes other important precautions and warnings for polyethylene glycol 3350, including details on who should not use this drug.
  • Side Effects of Polyethylene Glycol 3350
    Nausea and feeling bloated are among the possible side effects of polyethylene glycol 3350. As this eMedTV page discusses, there are also more serious problems, such as rectal bleeding and difficulty breathing, that may occur and require medical care.
  • Symptoms of Constipation
    Common symptoms of constipation include difficult, painful, and/or infrequent bowel movements. This part of the eMedTV library discusses other possible symptoms and lists several complications that can result from constipation, such as anal fissures.
  • What Is Polyethylene Glycol 3350 Used For?
    Polyethylene glycol 3350 is approved for treating occasional constipation. This eMedTV Web resource further discusses how this laxative works, whether it is safe for children, and possible off-label (unapproved) uses of polyethylene glycol 3350.
  • What to Do for Constapation
    Constipation treatment can involve lifestyle changes, laxatives, and enemas, among other things. This eMedTV page covers these and other treatment options. "What to do for constapation" is a common misspelling and variation of constipation treatment.
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